Black History November 7th

A Brief History

On November 7, 1775, in an announcement known as “Dunmore’s Proclamation,” the first movement to free African-Americans from slavery (also known as “emancipation”) took place when the Royal Governor of Virginia offered freedom to any slave willing to fight for the British against the Colonies in the American Revolution.  Between 800 and 2,000 black slaves accepted the offer, inciting rage and fear among Virginia’s slave holders.  Over the course of the Revolution, an estimated 100,000 slaves tried to take advantage of similar British offers, and at least 3,000 of them were sent to Nova Scotia as freemen.

Digging Deeper

Significant political milestones in African-American history were also reached on November 7, with Douglas Wilder becoming the first black U.S. governor as he was voted into office in Virginia and David Dinkens becoming the first black mayor of New York City!  (Both in 1989.)  History and Headlines Facts: Dinkins had served in the U.S. Marine Corps after initially being denied entry because the Marines had already reached their “racial quota.”  His main accomplishment during his one term as mayor was drastically reducing crime in the Big Apple.

Source: History and Headlines

Author: MsConcerned

“Upon descending our threaded words on the web by a steep and hazardous precipice of readers requires constant review.”

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