What Can Stop #PoliceBrutality & End #Racism?

The Temple

There are 5 temples mentioned in the bible – 1. The Garden 2. The Tabernacle 3. Solomon’s Temple, The “First” Temple 4. Herod’s Temple, The “Second” Temple 5. The Church. It is written – Don’t you know that you yourselves are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in your midst? 17If anyone destroys God’s temple, God will destroy that person; for God’s temple is sacred, and you together are that temple. It is worth mentioning that in the New Testament, no synagogue, temple, chapel, tabernacle, building, or any other meeting place was ever called a “church.” The term always referred to the Christian assembly and, in the New Testament, it was used for both the local community of believers and the overall collection of Christians.

The Origin in America

The first Africans in the New World arrived with Spanish and Portuguese explorers and settlers. By 1600 an estimated 275,000 Africans, both free and slave, were in Central and South America and the Caribbean area. Africans first arrived in the area that became the United States in 1619, when a handful of captives were sold by the captain of a Dutch man-of-war to settlers at Jamestown. Others were brought in increasing numbers to fill the desire for labor in a country where land was plentiful and labor scarce. By the end of the 17th century, approximately 1,300,000 Africans had landed in the New World. From 1701 to 1810 the number reached 6,000,000, with another 1,800,000 arriving after 1810. Some Africans were brought directly to the English colonies in North America. Others landed as slaves in the West Indies and were later resold and shipped to the mainland.


Slavery in America

The earliest African arrivals were viewed in the same way as indentured servants from Europe. This similarity did not long continue. By the latter half of the 17th century, clear differences existed in the treatment of black and white servants. A 1662 Virginia law assumed Africans would remain servants for life, and a 1667 act declared that “Baptisme doth not alter the condition of the person as to his bondage or freedom.” By 1740 the slavery system in colonial America was fully developed. A Virginia law in that year declared slaves to be “chattel personal in the hands of their owners and possessors for all intents, construction, and purpose whatsoever.”

Slaves Revolt

The first recorded slave revolt in the United States happened in Gloucester, Virginia, in 1663, an event involving white indentured servants as well as black slaves.

In 1672, there were reports of fugitive slaves forming groups to harass plantation owners. The first recorded all-black slave revolt occurred in Virginia in 1687.

Virginia was the host of several thwarted uprisings, including one in Richmond in 1800 and Spotsylvania County in 1815, but the state was also the scene of the most notorious slave rebellion in American history: Nat Turner’s Revolt.

Civil Rights

The civil rights movement was an organized effort by black Americans to end racial discrimination and gain equal rights under the law. It began in the late 1940s and ended in the late 1960s. Although tumultuous at times, the movement was mostly nonviolent and resulted in laws to protect every American’s constitutional rights, regardless of color, race, sex or national origin.

In general, the federal government stayed out of the civil rights struggle until 1964, when President Johnson pushed a Civil Rights Act through Congress that prohibited discrimination in public places, gave the Justice Department permission to sue states that discriminated against women and minorities and promised equal opportunities in the workplace to all. The next year, the Voting Rights Act eliminated poll taxes, literacy requirements and other tools that southern whites had traditionally used to keep blacks from voting.

But these laws did not solve the problems facing African Americans: They did not eliminate racism or poverty and they did not improve the conditions in many black urban neighborhoods. Many black leaders began to rethink their goals, and some embraced a more militant ideology of separatism and self-defense.

Civil Rights History Time Line

July 26, 1948: President Harry Truman issues Executive Order 9981 to end segregation in the Armed Services.

May 17, 1954: Brown v. Board of Education, a consolidation of five cases into one, is decided by the Supreme Court, effectively ending racial segregation in public schools. Many schools, however, remained segregated.

August 28, 1955: Emmett Till, a 14-year-old from Chicago is brutally murdered in Mississippi for allegedly flirting with a white woman. His murderers are acquitted, and the case bring international attention to the civil rights movement after Jet magazine publishes a photo of Till’s beaten body at his open-casket funeral.

December 1, 1955: Rosa Parks refuses to give up her seat to a white man on a Montgomery, Alabama bus. Her defiant stance prompts a year-long Montgomery bus boycott.

January 10-11, 1957: Sixty black pastors and civil rights leaders from several southern states—including Martin Luther King, Jr.—meet in Atlanta, Georgia to coordinate nonviolent protests against racial discrimination and segregation.

September 4, 1957: Nine black students known as the “Little Rock Nine” are blocked from integrating into Little Rock Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. President Dwight D. Eisenhower eventually sends federal troops to escort the students, however, they continue to be harassed.

September 9, 1957: Eisenhower signs the Civil Rights Act of 1957 into law to help protect voter rights. The law allows federal prosecution of those who suppress another’s right to vote.

February 1, 1960: Four African American college students in Greensboro, North Carolina refuse to leave a Woolworth’s “whites only” lunch counter without being served. The Greensboro Four—Ezell Blair Jr., David Richmond, Franklin McCain and Joseph McNeil—were inspired by the nonviolent protest of Gandhi. The Greensboro Sit-In, as it came to be called, sparks similar “sit-ins” throughout the city and in other states.

November 14, 1960: Six-year-old Ruby Bridges is escorted by four armed federal marshals as she becomes the first student to integrate William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans. Her actions inspired Norman Rockwell’s painting The Problem We All Live With (1964).

1961: Throughout 1961, black and white activists, known as freedom riders, took bus trips through the American South to protest segregated bus terminals and attempted to use “whites-only” restrooms and lunch counters. The Freedom Rides were marked by horrific violence from white protestors, they drew international attention to their cause.

June 11, 1963: Governor George C. Wallace stands in a doorway at the University of Alabama to block two black students from registering. The standoff continues until President John F. Kennedy sends the National Guard to the campus.

August 28, 1963: Approximately 250,000 people take part in The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Martin Luther King gives his “I Have A Dream” speech as the closing address in front of the Lincoln Memorial, stating, “I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.’”

September 15, 1963: A bomb at 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama kills four young girls and injures several other people prior to Sunday services. The bombing fuels angry protests.

July 2, 1964: President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law, preventing employment discrimination due to race, color, sex, religion or national origin. Title VII of the Act establishes the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to help prevent workplace discrimination.

February 21, 1965: Black religious leader Malcolm X is assassinated during a rally by members of the Nation of Islam.

March 7, 1965: Bloody Sunday. In the Selma to Montgomery March, around 600 civil rights marchers walk to Selma, Alabama to Montgomery—the state’s capital—in protest of black voter suppression. Local police block and brutally attack them. After successfully fighting in court for their right to march, Martin Luther King and other civil rights leaders lead two more marches and finally reach Montgomery on March 25.

August 6, 1965: President Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965 to prevent the use of literacy tests as a voting requirement. It also allowed federal examiners to review voter qualifications and federal observers to monitor polling places.

April 4, 1968:Martin Luther King, Jr. is assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room in Memphis, Tennessee. James Earl Ray is convicted of the murder in 1969.

April 11, 1968: President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1968, also known as the Fair Housing Act, providing equal housing opportunity regardless of race, religion or national origin.

June 2020: The Justice in Policing Act of 2020 is a civil rights and police reform bill drafted by Democrats in the United States Congress, including members of the Congressional Black Caucus. The legislation was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives on June 8, 2020. The legislation aims to combat police misconduct, excessive force, and racial bias in policing.

So we started as slaves, we were freed, we couldn’t vote so we marched, and we marched and we boycotted and we marched. Black men women and children have been brutally murdered in the streets of the US since forever and it wasn’t until #GeorgeFloyd that we began marching and protesting again. So if at first you don’t succeed try, try again… When will marching and protested end racism – it won’t! So what is the answer – this writer tends to think that it will take everyone learning how the Hand of God works.

Recent racially charged incidents including the tragic death of George Floyd have stirred ensuing riots and torn open the rawest of wounds – racism. Judging a person according to skin color is an ancient sin. For that reason, God gave this ancient solution.

In the earliest words of Scripture, God spoke: “Let us make human beings in our image, make them reflecting our nature so they can be responsible for the fish in the sea, the birds in the air, the cattle, and, yes, Earth itself, and every animal that moves on the face of Earth” (Genesis 1:26). Let us, who is “us” – If you search the Bible you will find that when the Almighty speaks of “us” or “our,” He is addressing His Power not the angles otherwise we would have wings.

How then can we stop police brutality and end racism when each of us understands who we are in relationship to God and the power we have within…

 

References:

History.com Editors. (2009, November 12). Slave rebellions. HISTORY. https://www.history.com/topics/black-history/slavery-iv-slave-rebellions

Search results. (n.d.). Scholastic | Books for Kids | Parent & Teacher Resources‎. https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/search-results/?search=1&prefilter=&filters=teachers_ss_dp:articles-and-collections%7C*&text=black%20history#lessons-plans

History.com Editors. (2009, November 9). Martin Luther King, Jr. HISTORY. https://www.history.com/topics/black-history/martin-luther-king-jr

‘Teacher’s Manual’ by American educator Thomas H. Palmer and ‘The Children of the New Forest‘ by English novelist Frederick Maryat (1792-1848).

(“Max Lucado: What is the answer to racism? This profound yet simple promise,” 2020)

Black men in #Chicago

An email this morning from The Black Star Project read, “89% of young Black men in Chicago 16- to 19-years old are not working. 43% of young Black men in Chicago 20- to 24-years old are not in school and not working.  Now we know why there is so much violence in Chicago.  Brothers gotta eat and feed they seed!  Please Click Here to ask President Donald Trump for assistance to put these young Black men to work and reduce violence in Chicago.”

 

Are you kidding me, are you seriously requesting folks to contact the current #potus for assistance to put our “young Black Men” to work?  With all the resources “we” have “we” can put a plan together to help those that look like us?  Are the Chicago Representatives unable to facilitate a program incorporating residents of Chicago?  I guess the element of desire would need to be a factor in facilitating relief for the remaining 43%.   That would mean that folks would have go onto the streets of neighborhoods they would rather see from the “flat screen” in a secure safe environment.

Duckworth, Tammy – (D – IL)
G12 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2854
Contact: http://www.duckworth.senate.gov/content/contact-senator

 

Durbin, Richard J. – (D – IL)
711 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2152
Contact: http://www.durbin.senate.gov/contact/

As I watched the DNC Chair Candidate Forum there were few statements I remember – Robert Vinson Brannum and Keith Ellison – “…it’s time to step up…”

 

It’s time those of us who have $2.00 more than we did 20 years ago to take our Blue and Black Perry Ellis suits jackets off and roll up our sleeves and go back to the neighborhoods from which we came and walk through the door of shame, guilt, and look and faces of our young black men and women who have no purposeful vision and each one literally take one by the hand and walk them on the #bus of opportunity.

 

https://www.c-span.org/video/?c4656426/dnc-future-forum-baltimore

 

Do You Have 2 Hours a Year to #Mentor #BlackStudents…

do-you-have-2-hours-to-a-year-to-mentor-black-students

If You Don’t We Do

Chicago has had more than 4,000 shootings so far this year and 700 plus murders, mostly young Black men shooting and killing other young Black men. During the month of December 2016, these Chicago schools are asking for mentors to come speak life into their students and to share about the positive aspects of living in Chicago:

Oglesby Elementary School, Fulton Elementary School, Proviso West High School, Brunson Elementary School, Clissold Elementary School, Chatham Leadership Academy High School, Lewis Elementary School, Air Force Academy High School, Joplin Elementary School, Burnham Elementary School, Reavis Elementary School, G.R. Clark Elementary School, Lakeside High School, Chopin Elementary School, Excel Academy Shore Shore/Woodlawn High School, Langford Academy Elementary School.

Source:  The Black Star Project National Initiatives

crime-in-bridgeport

Bridgeport, CT

Hartford, CT

Hartford, CT

 

Video of a fight in the hallways of Harding High School – Bridgeport, CT

Social Media is NOT the cause of the fights in school and anyone who thinks so needs to be either re-educated or leave the institutions of Academia and make room for folks who are not afraid of the “Boards” and are willing to go the distance to ensure our students receive a full education in a safe environment.  For the love of Christ stop bailing out behind “it the fault of some other platform”!

No refuge could save the hireling and slave

 

 

National Anthem

Just a month after the British had burned the White House during the height of the War of 1812, Key was aboard a British vessel negotiating the release of a friend who was being held prisoner. During Key’s time aboard the vessel, the British commenced an attack on Fort McHenry, and the pair was not allowed to leave. So Key and his friend watched from the ship as the British bombarded Fort McHenry.

There are historians (notably Robin Blackburn, author of The Overthrow of Colonial Slavery, 1776-1848, and Alan Taylor, author of “American Blacks in the War of 1812”), who have indeed read the stanza as glorying in the Americans’ defeat of the Corps of Colonial Marines, one of two units of black slaves recruited between 1808 and 1816 to fight for the British on the promise of gaining their freedom. Like so many of his compatriots, Francis Scott Key, the wealthy American lawyer who wrote “The Star-Spangled Banner” in the wake of the Battle of Fort McHenry on 14 September 1814, was a slaveholder who believed blacks to be “a distinct and inferior race of people, which all experience proves to be the greatest evil that afflicts a community.” It goes without saying that Key did not have the enslaved black population of America in mind when he penned the words “land of the free.” It would be logical to assume, as well, that he might have harbored a special resentment toward African Americans who fought against the United States on behalf of the King.

 

lyrics-defined_001

 

Lyrics Definitions
And where is that band who so vauntingly swore where is that flag who boasted and praised
That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion The widespread destruction of war and confusion
A home and a country should leave us no more Not sure about this one whose home (Britain) should leave us no more or the (New Britain)
Their blood has wiped out their foul footstep’s pollution The British army stunk up the place with their foul footsteps, but we used their blood to wash the place out. Kinda militaristic and barbaric,
No refuge could save the hireling and slave Let’s break this down by definition:

Refuge – A condition of being safe or sheltered;

Hireling – A person employed to undertake menial work

Slave – A person who is the legal property of another and is forced to obey them

A slave by definition is very different from a Hireling

Claudette Colvin

Rosa Parks is well-known for her refusal to give up her seat to a white passenger on a public bus in Montgomery, Ala., in December 1955.

Claudette Colvin was just 15 when she refused to give up her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Alabama. It was nine months before Rosa Parks’ act of defiance in 1955.  But Parks’ civil rights protest did have a precedent: Fifteen-year-old Claudette Colvin, a student at a black high school in Montgomery, had refused to move from her bus seat nine months earlier. However, Colvin is not nearly as well-known, and certainly not as celebrated, as Parks.

“[The bus driver said], ‘Give me those seats,'” Colvin recalled. “Three of the girls got up and moved. But I remained seated.”

Colvin said she drew her strength from African-American abolitionists she had just learned about in school.

Who are the Americans

Let’s be clear; folks came to this place called New Britain raped, plundered and killed the inhabitant (Native Individuals) and claimed property.  Then the grandfathers of the new land now known as America came and tried kill some of the people who left Britain, they lost and went back home but not without maintaining a great deal of authority and huge percentage tax of the dollars made here in this new land. For example – the Boston Tea Party happened as a result of “taxation without representation”, yet the cause is more complex than that. The American colonists believed Britain was unfairly taxing them to pay for expenses incurred during the French and Indian War. Additionally, colonists believed Parliament did not have the right to tax them because the American colonies were not represented in Parliament.

With a that said it still amazes me that black folk think this is their land and they have any rights to anything other than what is not needed by the folks who own “…this land is NOT your land.”  We still perpetuate the Rosa Parks story as if Claudette never existed. Which brings me to another point, the same way we dismiss Claudette who was too black, too pregnant and not married enough – we embrace this behavior today in 2016 as the commenter asked Cornell, “why don’t you use 2016” – well there is it.  We still look down of folks who have not come out of the projects; we shun folks who are not part of our cults, and we even shut our family members out when folks of another seem to embrace us.

Last note:  If your new found friendship with an elitist group embraces you if they are “true”,  they will embrace all of you, your illegitimate brother and sisters, jail-bound nephews, drug addicted aunts and uncles, holier than thou religious freaks, and the “plano” simple family member who could care less about degrees and dollars! But you see that won’t happen especially when  #office and #wealth become the gods of a people, and the most unworthy and unfit most aspire to the former, and fraud becomes the highway to the latter, the land will reek with falsehood and sweat #lies and chicane. (Albert Pike)

WAKE UP!

Sources:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/before-rosa-parks-another-woman-defied-segregation/

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2015/02/27/389563788/before-rosa-parks-a-teenager-defied-segregation-on-an-alabama-bus

http://www.snopes.com

http://thewhitedsepulchre.blogspot.com

 

Baltimore City State’s Attorney

mosby

Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby gave a blistering speech Wednesday which explains why it is near impossible to convict police officers in this country.

In her speech, Mosby said she took an oath to “never cower” from cases where she believes she has probable cause. The case of Freddie Gray, whose spine was somehow severed in a police van, leading to his death, was one such cas

Mosby’s prosecution of the police officers involved in Gray’s death, however, saw no convictions. During Mosby’s twelve minute press conference, she lays out a stunning indictment against Baltimore police in explaining why the prosecutions imploded.

“There was a reluctance and obvious bias that was consistently exemplified, not by the entire Baltimore Police Department, but by individuals within the Baltimore Police Department at every stage of the investigation, which became blatantly apparent in the subsequent trial,” said Mosby.

“There were individual police officers who were witnesses to the case, yet were part of the investigative team,” said Mosby in a bombshell revelation. “Interrogations that were conducted without asking the most poignant questions, lead investigators that were totally uncooperative and started a counter-investigation to disprove the state’s case by not executing search warrants pertaining to text messages among the police officers involved in the case.”

Mosby also accused police investigators of “creating videos to disprove the state’s case, creating notes that were drafted after the case was launched to contradict the medial examiner’s conclusion.” She then accused the investigating officers of turning over these notes to the defense “months prior” to turning them over to the prosecution.

“We’ve all bore witness to an inherent bias that is the direct result of when police police themselves,” Mosby concluded.

Mosby revealed that she’d previously not been allowed to speak on the case due to a gag order.

Comments:  Now that we know this information what’s next, as an African American woman did her desire to maintain her job preclude her from exorcising ANY moral and/or integrity as a Black Woman in this day and time to providing disclosure before the verdict was submitted?

Watch the video below:

Mosby Press Conference

Story by: Naturally Moi

 

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Raised Fists at West Point

 

 

The controversial photo of the 16 Black Female West Point Cadets.  What is the controversy – did they break any DOD regulations; where they too Black for West Point;  are they supporters of #BlackLivesMatter; is West Point supporting #BlackLivesMatter?

For  those of you who do not know –  Black Lives Matter (BLM) is an activist movement,  that campaigns against violence toward black people. BLM regularly organizes protests around the deaths of black people in killings by law enforcement officers, and broader issues of racial profiling, police brutality, and racial inequality in the United States criminal justice system.

Why does this matter you ask? For a variety of reasons:

  1. The number of peopled killed by police reportedly was 1,145 of that number 4% were white or Asian;
  2. The disproportion number of black men serving time for crimes also committed by other races;
  3. The many disparities across forums such as health care, child care, education from Pre-K to High School;

What is the purpose of the Military – To defend our country from potential threats, hurt, harm or danger.

What is taught at West Point – “The United States Military Academy’s mission is to educate, train and inspire the Corps of Cadets so that each graduate is a commissioned leader of character committed to the values of Duty, Honor, Country and prepared for a career of professional excellence and service to the nation as an officer in the United States Army.

The Academy provides a superb four-year education, which focuses on the leader development of cadets in the academic, military, and physical domains, all underwritten by adherence to a code of honor.”

West Point’s Comparative Politics Program (excerpt) – The West Point Comparative Politics Program provides cadets with the intellectual tools and knowledge of core theories and concepts to better understand why some states fail and others remain stable.  Cadets have the opportunity to view critical comparative politics issues in a multi-perspective manner by taking related courses both in and out of the department.  After mastering the core concepts, cadets can tailor their program towards a regional (e.g., Africa, Middle East, etc.) or functional (e.g., negotiation, democratization, post-conflict stabilization, etc.) focus. The comparative politics courses and related electives provide cadets with the knowledge and framework to apply the core concepts and theories to relevant case studies and issues.

On the American side of Social ScienceStudents also consider processes such as political leadership, voting and group behavior. Strong emphasis is placed on the unique, and what some might consider exceptional ‘soldier-state’ civil-military relationship in the American experience.

 The West Point American Politics program provides students with a solid understanding of the fundamentals of political science theory and practice in the context of American Governance.

 

In this writer’s opinion the aforementioned students were provided an outstanding education (not to mention the prerequisites for entry) which has prepared them to understand the political arena and socioeconomic development or lack of as a Cadet, as a Woman, Black Woman and now as a member of an organization designed to create and foster character.

Surely if they exhibited any other traits and/or behaviors that did not align with the mission, vision and values of West Point they would not have achieved the title of “Cadet”.

 

The West Point Mission


missiongrad.jpg“To educate, train, and inspire the Corps of Cadets so that each graduate is a commissioned leader of character committed to the values of Duty, Honor, Country and prepared for a career of professional excellence and service to the Nation as an officer in the United States Army.”

Fox News West Point Investigation

Department of Defense Directive – Political Activities by Members of the Armed Forces

How Can You Teach Us Civics When You Can’t/Won’t Vote?

 

 

 

Martin Luther

Martin Luther King, Jr January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968

 

On this day we celebrate the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  Most folk knew him for his speech, “I Have a Dream”.  A hero to blacks and source of pain for whites.  Martin was known for exposing the evil against black folk and providing peaceful ways for black man and women to claim ownership of simple and equal rights in America, note:  the Supreme Court disapproved of King’s methods.  Psalm 94:16 reads: Who will rise up against the wicked?  Who will stand for me against those who practice iniquity?  The federal government didn’t act until they were pressured to act; President Kennedy thought King was directed by Communists and President Johnson didn’t trust the King’s judgment and Hoover thought of him as a threat to national security.

King and ObamaOn Monday, November 2, 1964 King was questioned whether he had purchased a radio station urging Negros to write his name in for President.  King replied, This is a cruel and vicious attempt to confuse Negro voters and nullify their votes. So I would like to take this opportunity to urge every Negro voter to vote for one of the candidates on the ballot.  I am not a candidate, please do not write in my name.  This will waste the entire ballot.  The handbills and radio announcements urging you to write in my name are part of an attempt to cancel out your vote.  This is an insult to me and to Negroes generally.   I call on you to repudiate this plot by getting out and voting for one of the candidates on the ballot.”

1954 – Did you know that Strom Thurmond, the late South Carolina Senator who served for nearly 48 years was the first write-in candidate elected to the U.S. Congress. Thurmond ran as a write-in candidate after the death of Senator Burnet R. Maybank in 1954 to protest the South Carolina Democratic Executive Committee’s nomination of State Senator Edgar Brown rather than by primary election.  At the time, the Democratic Party was the only party in South Carolina, so if Thurmond had not stepped in, Brown would have easily won the election without a challenge. The states that do not allow Presidential Candidates are: Arkansas, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Oklahoma and South Dakota.

 

Friday, January 1965, Selma’s teachers, 105 of them, men and women, dressed as if they were going to church, marched on the courthouse where the Registrar’s Office was, waving toothbrushes, a sign of their commitment to spend the night in jail if they had to.  Not long afterwards the students took to the streets, 161 of them carrying signs that read, “Let our parents vote.”   Selma’s Sheriff Clark charged them with truancy and force-marched them out of town, pursued by police, state troopers, and his own private posse.  They were beaten, they were shocked with electric cattle prods, and many fell to the ground unable to move.  One of these students, Letha Mae Stover, looked up and saw a police officer forcing her to rise, jabbing her in the back, remarking, “You want to march?  I’ll teach you how to march.”  But she couldn’t move, and she told him, “You might as well kill me.  I can’t get up.”

right to vote

Did You Know

Republican Party played a key role in the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.  The Voting Rights Act was written in the office of Everett Dirksen, the Republican Minority Leader, and without his help and the help of others, the Act would not have passed.

 

 

hotel where king was shot
There was a “hush” over America on April 4, 1968

 

 

One of President Obama’s favorite quotes of Dr. King’s is the one that comes from Dr. King’s speech to the marchers at the end of the march on March 25, 1965.  “The arc of the moral universe is long,” King said, drawing on the words of the abolitionist, Theodore Parker, “but it bends towards justice.”  To which President Obama added, “Here’s the thing.  That arc does not bend on its own.  It bends because each of us, in our own way, puts our hand on that arc and we bend it in the direction of justice.”

Do you know the relevance of Acting Attorney General Nick Katzenbach?

 

 

MsConcerned