Black History November 7th

A Brief History

On November 7, 1775, in an announcement known as “Dunmore’s Proclamation,” the first movement to free African-Americans from slavery (also known as “emancipation”) took place when the Royal Governor of Virginia offered freedom to any slave willing to fight for the British against the Colonies in the American Revolution.  Between 800 and 2,000 black slaves accepted the offer, inciting rage and fear among Virginia’s slave holders.  Over the course of the Revolution, an estimated 100,000 slaves tried to take advantage of similar British offers, and at least 3,000 of them were sent to Nova Scotia as freemen.

Digging Deeper

Significant political milestones in African-American history were also reached on November 7, with Douglas Wilder becoming the first black U.S. governor as he was voted into office in Virginia and David Dinkens becoming the first black mayor of New York City!  (Both in 1989.)  History and Headlines Facts: Dinkins had served in the U.S. Marine Corps after initially being denied entry because the Marines had already reached their “racial quota.”  His main accomplishment during his one term as mayor was drastically reducing crime in the Big Apple.

Source: History and Headlines

A Lil Lesson Critical Race Theory

Can You Spot The Difference

A Bridgeport man has been charged in a fatal shooting. 

Police arrested Robert Sorrells for the deadly shooting of Jonathan DaSilva. 

The shooting happened Oct. 2 on Arctic and Pembroke streets. 

Sorrells was taken into custody last night and faces murder and gun-related charges. 

Officials say he is being held on a $2 million bond.

A Fairfield County man who is awaiting trial for an earlier DUI has been charged with driving drunk and killing an area woman. 

Robert Oxer, age 26, of Darien, was charged on Thursday, Oct. 21 with a warrant for manslaughter with a motor vehicle, operating under the influence and motor vehicle charges, said the Connecticut State Police. 

Oxer was charged in connection with a crash on Route 8 in Trumbull on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020.

During the crash he was allegedly driving a motorcycle at more than 80 miles per hour when he hit the back of another vehicle, state police said. 

His passenger, 36-year-old Shirley Regado-Rodriguez, of Stamford, was pronounced dead at the scene from multiple injuries. 

Court records show Oxer is awaiting trial on several charges, including strangulation stemming from a 2019 arrest in Darien. 

He is being held on a $250,000 bond.

Inmates, Covid, Healthcare and The African American

African American Prisoners/Healthcare for COVID-19

I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me. Like the bodiless heads you see sometimes in circus sideshows, it is as though I have been surrounded by mirrors of hard, distorting glass. When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves or figments of their imagination, indeed, everything and anything except me. Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man (1952)

A Personal Story

I think there are great deal of folk that have had the experience of have a male family member incarcerated only to find out that they were not the same young man they knew before the incarceration.  I don’t know that we all can identify when trying to reconnect that not only are they different, but we too have evolved this makes for strange bedfellows.  Personally, I have interacted with a family member only to find myself more frustrated at the behavior of said individual than realizing he is different.  I don’t know what it is like to be incarcerate (in jail) albeit I have my own struggles where I voluntarily opted for incarceration metaphorically.  Non-the-less, I don’t know what it’s like to wake up in the same cage day after day, week after week, month after month, year after year and/or decade after decade.  I haven’t got a clue what it must be like to be controlled i.e. told what to wear, when to get up when to lay down, when I can shower, when I can a make a phone call.  I don’t know what  it’s like to be locked up with nothing but men/women without any freedoms that you and I take for granted on any given day.  I don’t know why the history of Black men has positioned a person to fall into the category of inmate, jail bird, or felon.  I’ve heard the idea that the construction of prisons were/are constructed based on 3rd grade scores – Experts often cite third grade as a decisive year for students and schools. In fact, there is common folklore that asserts that public officials will forecast prison construction based on a state’s third-grade literacy rates.   An article in The Atlantic called this phenomenon “An Urban Myth That Should Be True.” The article goes on to say, “U.S. prison planners don’t use local third-grade reading scores to predict future inmate populations. But maybe they should.” This is a two topic writing on the healthcare of the inmate and that of the Black American and Covid-19.

The persistent and pervasive notion of African American male criminality which was injected into the American consciousness during the post Reconstruction period persists steadfastly today in the United States. It is a driving force behind the nation ’ s post-1970 mass incarceration binge for which economically disadvantaged Black males are the primary victims. It also serves as fuel for insensitive comments, unwarranted surveillance, and other microaggressions such as those now in the media glare. Few African American males, regardless of their achievement, social standing or economic status, are immune to the stress associated with these subtle forms of hostility

Healthcare and the Inmate

Imprisonment, homicide, non-lethal assault and other crime, chronic and infectious disease, substance abuse, suicide, and accidents all contribute to the much wider gap in the community-level sex ratios found among African Americans compared to those observed found among other ethnic and racial groups in the United States. This wide array of causes and correlates of African American male mortality, disability, and confinement suggests that one area in need of interdisciplinary inquiry that examines the intersection between public health and public safety. These lines of inquiry must situate and contextualize the lived experiences of the African American male. Health analysts and social scientists across many disciplines have all studied African Americans and their communities extensively over the past decades because this population has disproportionately high levels of disease, disability, premature death, and exposure to the criminal justice system.

A large body of research has documented black, white disparities in health and mortality in the United States ( Adler & Rehkopf, 2008 ; Frisbie, Song, Powers, & Street, 2004 ; Geruso, 2012 ; Pampel, Krueger, & Denney, 2010 ; Williams & Jackson, 2005 ; Williams & Mohammed, 2009 ). Racial differences in socioeconomic status (e.g., income, education) largely account for these gaps with individual and institutional discrimination, residential segregation, and bias in healthcare settings also explaining some of the variation in black, white disparities (Braveman et al., 2011 ; Williams, 1999 ; Williams & Jackson, 2005 ).

Afro-American Healthcare & COVID-19

Speaking of the disparities in health care among Blacks and Whites brings me to another topic – Covid-19.  As most people in the world are now acutely aware, an outbreak of COVID-19 was detected in mainland China in December of 2019.  Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that can cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses such as the common cold, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).  When an infected person coughs or sneezes, the new coronavirus may be transmitted through expelled droplets. These droplets can enter a person’s system through “contact routes,” such as the mouth, eyes, or nose. It is also possible for the droplets to be inhaled into the lungs.

The concept of COVID-19 hit the news airways like the plague.  Folk ran out and emptied the grocery story of every roll of tissue paper, alcohol and contamination cleaning products.  Addictions rose, folks died, both individuals and establishments lost their lives, and the country was shut down.  This would cause the sanest person to question the reason for living. 

Statistical data document that African Americans have a worse health profile and higher rate of death than White Americans for practically every illness. Broader surveys of self-assessed health using a comparative framework have found that African Americans are nearly twice as likely as White Americans to rate their health as “fair” or “poor,” and twice as likely as White Americans to rate their health as “fair” or “poor,” and that self-rated health is a strong predictor of sickness and early death (Bratter and Gorman, 2011).  Middle-class African Americans have a better health profile than their less affluent counterparts, but many report serious health challenges as common in their families.

Much like the prisoner many Black Americans suffer the same inequalities of healthcare whether locked up or free.  With that said how will Black Americans come out as the victor during these turbulent times?

What We Know

Black communities share common social and economic factors, already in place before the pandemic, that increase their risk for COVID-19. Those factors include:

  • Living in crowded housing conditions. “Crowded living conditions are a difficult challenge that is the result of longstanding racial residential segregation and prior redlining policies,” Golden says. “It is difficult for 10 individuals living in a three-room apartment to appropriately physical distance.” She says advocacy on these broader policy issues could help prevent future disparities in disease outcomes.
  • Working in essential fields. Golden notes that people working in environmental services, food services, the transportation sector and home health care cannot work from home. These positions put workers in close contact with others.
  • Inconsistent access to health care due to lack of insurance or underinsurance. Being able to afford doctors’ visits, medications and equipment to manage chronic disease is essential to lowering the risk of death from COVID-19 and other conditions. For instance, a patient with badly controlled diabetes or asthma due to inconsistent treatment is more at risk for severe, even deadly, coronavirus infection.
  • Chronic health conditions. Golden points out that people of color have a higher burden of chronic health conditions associated with a poor outcome from COVID-19, including diabetes, heart disease and lung disease. In a study cited by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 90% of those hospitalized with severe COVID-19 had at least one of these underlying medical conditions.
  • Stress and immunity. Studies have proved that stress has a physiological effect on the body’s ability to defend itself against disease. Income inequality, discrimination, violence and institutional racism contribute to chronic stress in people of color that can wear down immunity, making them more vulnerable to infectious disease.

Distrust

Why is that the Black American holds on to memories of years gone by when it comes to their health.  The now infamous Tuskegee Syphilis study is perhaps the most widely known study exclusive to African Americans males.  Yet in present day the number of references to this experiment in conjunction with the COVID-19 vaccine are astronomical.  African  Americans  have  experienced  something  that others have not: the unique combination  of racism, slavery and segregation. It has caused African  Americans to develop  not  only  different  behavioral patterns, values, and beliefs but also different  definitions, standards, and  differences  in  value  systems  and  perspectives(Randall,  1996). Distrust  of  the health  care  system  by African  Americans  runs  from  the  feelings  or  ill  gains for  participation  in clinical trials to being used  only as guinea  pigs. In addition,  there  are feelings  by  African Americans  whether  the physician,   intentional   or not,  do  treat  minority  patients  differently  than  White patients  (Lake,  Snell,  Perry,  & Associates  2004).  If that is true then the reluctance to take the vaccine is valid.  Additionally many Americans feel that the vaccine was rushed and not enough due diligence has been put forth.

Texas Teacher Puts Foot On Students Neck

UPDATE: Greenville ISD Teacher Who Put Foot On Student’s Neck For Photo Resigns As Board Was To Consider Termination

GREENVILLE, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – The Greenville Independent School District has placed one of their teachers on administrative leave, and is conducting an investigation after a photo surfaced of one of their staff members with their foot on a student’s neck.

Wednesday morning, April 21, Greenville ISD sent an apology letter to parents.

GISD Superintendent Demetrus Liggins says the photo was very disturbing. “My initial reaction was first concern for the child, followed by immediate disgust by the image.”

The Jackson family, however, has mixed opinions on the image. The 11-year-old in the photo, Zaelyn Jackson, says he thought it was all a joke.

American First Caucus

WASHINGTON – A nascent effort by some conservative House of Representatives Republicans to form an “America First Caucus” to promote the policies of former President Donald Trump drew criticism on Friday for purported racial undertones in its founding document.

The effort is tied to first-term Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene and has a policy platform that promotes “a common respect for uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions” and advocates for infrastructure with esthetic value that “befits the progeny of European architecture,” Punchbowl News reported on Friday.

https://www.mercurynews.com/2021/04/16/house-effort-to-form-america-first-caucus-sparks-blowback/amp/

An NPR study from January revealed some unsurprising, yet troubling data on police violence against unarmed Black Americans.

  • 75% of the officers who shot and killed unarmed Black citizens were white.
  • 19 of the 135 officers (14%) were rookies with less than a year on their police force, including one that fatally shot an unarmed Black person within four hours of being on the force.
  • A quarter of victims were killed during traffic stops.
  • Roughly 18% of the victims suffered from a diagnosed mental illness.
  • 33 out of 135 officers were either fired or resigned; 3 officers successfully were reinstated into their position.
  • 5 of the officers went on to work for other police departments.
  • 13 out 135 were charged with murder, 2 were found guilty, 3 were acquitted and 7 have pending cases.
  • At least six officers had troubled pasts before being hired onto police departments, including drug use and domestic violence. One officer had been fired from another law enforcement agency, and at least two others were forced out.
  • Nearly 60% of the shootings occurred in the South, with more than a quarter in Texas, Georgia and Louisiana.

George Floyd We Have Not Forgotten You

Eaves, 72, is one of the volunteers who regularly tend the area where George Floyd was killed by police. In this four-block radius, some residents and volunteers work together to keep things running as they hold the space while pressing the city to meet their demands. Eaves picks up trash and checks on plants. He shifts artwork and tributes around to make them more visible. He cleans to present what he calls an “aesthetic dignity” to the space.

Biden vs. Trump

We’re not looking for Biden to #FixIt we’re looking to not have tRump phuck it up anymore.

Nashville Explosion and #BLM

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — An explosion shook the largely deserted streets of downtown Nashville early Christmas morning, shattering windows, damaging buildings and wounding three people. Authorities said they believed the blast was intentional. The FBI is leading the investigation.

Metro Nashville Police Department spokesman Don Aaron said police responded to a call of shots fired just before 6 a.m. but found no immediate signs of a shooting, although officers noticed a suspicious vehicle and called for a hazardous unit. While they waited, the vehicle exploded.

Read more

As I read the news clip from my handy dandy News alert program on my phone, I read over the comments to the event and was annoyed to read one of the commenters stated that it was probably Antifa (Antifa is a left-wing anti-fascist and anti-racist political movement in the United States) or BLM (Black Lives Matter is a decentralized political and social movement advocating for non-violent civil disobedience in protest against incidents of police brutality and all racially motivated violence against black people).

Listen let me educate you folk on one thing.  BLM has never to my knowledge blown up a building.  Sure protests have gathered thousands of people every day. In some cases, police officers have kneeled with protestors; in many others, they have retaliated with tear gas, rubber bullets, and even police vehicles. Most protests have opted for a peaceful route. The small minority has turned violent: riots in Minnesota have caused fires and destruction. There have also been many recent occurrences of looting or taking of goods by force and causing destruction to stores and public buildings.  

In every group of folks there will be that 10% who will either go against the grain or participate in extreme measures. Furthermore, when we were snatched from our homes we didn’t come with guns, nooses, or bombs.  Those items were introduced to us.

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