Tuesday Motivation

A bell is not a bell
till you ring it,
A song is not a song
till you sing it,
Love in your heart
is not put there to stay,
Love is not love
till you give it away.

Your Children and the News

With everything going on in the news today, it can be frightening for young people. Here are a few tips to help your child understand/navigate the news.

Find Out What Your Child Already Knows

    Ask your kids questions to see if they know about a current event. For school-age kids and teens, you can ask what they have heard at school or on social media.

    Consider your child’s age and development. Younger kids may not grasp the difference between fact and fantasy. Most kids realize the news is real by the time they are 7 or 8 years old.

    Follow your child’s lead. If your child doesn’t seem interested in an event or doesn’t want to talk about it at the moment, don’t push.

Answer Questions Honestly and Briefly

    Tell the truth, but share only as much as your child needs to know. Try to calm any fears and help kids feel safe. Don’t offer more details than your child is interested in.

    Listen carefully. For some kids, hearing about an upsetting event or natural disaster might make them worry, “Could I be next? Could that happen to me?” Older kids may have lots of questions. Focus on what your kids ask so you can help them cope with their fears. An adult’s willingness to listen sends a powerful message.

    It’s OK to say you don’t know the answer. If your child asks a question that stumps you, say you’ll find out. Or use age-appropriate websites to spend time together looking for an answer.

Help Kids Feel in Control

    Encourage your child to talk. If your child is afraid about what’s going on, ask about it. Even when kids can’t control an event — like a natural disaster — it can help them to share their fears with you.

    Urge teens to look beyond a news story. Ask why they think an outlet featured a frightening or disturbing story. Was it to boost ratings and clicks or because the story was truly newsworthy? In this way, a scary story can be turned into a discussion about the role and mission of the news.

    Teach your children to be prepared, not panicked. For example, if the news is about a natural disaster, make a family plan for what you might do. If an illness is spreading, talk about ways to protect yourself and others.

    Talk about what you can do to help. After a tragic event, finding ways to help can give kids a sense of control. Look for news stories that highlight what other people are doing.

    Put news stories in context. Broaden the discussion from a specific news item about a difficult event to a larger conversation. Use it as a way to talk about helping, cooperation, and the ways that people cope with hardship.

Limit Exposure to the News

    Decide what and how much news is appropriate for your child. Think about how old your kids are and how mature they are. Encourage them to take breaks from following the news, especially when the topics are difficult.

    Keep tabs on the amount of difficult news your child hears. Notice how often you discuss the news in front of your kids. Turn off the TV so the news is not playing in the background all day.

    Set limits. It’s OK to tell your kids that you don’t want them to have constant exposure and to set ground rules on device and social media use.

    Watch the news with your child and talk about it. Turn off a story if you think it’s not appropriate for your child.

Keep the Conversation Going

    Talk about current events with your child often. Help kids think through stories they hear – good and bad. Ask questions like: “What do you think about these events?” or “How do you think these things happen?” With these types of questions, you can encourage conversation about non-news topics.

    Watch for stress. If your child shows changes in behavior (such as not sleeping or eating, not wanting to be around people, or worrying all the time), call your child’s doctor or a behavioral health care provider. They can help your child manage anxiety and feel better able to cope

#ASAP

Happy New Year

Goodnight Dawn Wells

Dawn Wells, who played the loveable castaway Mary Ann Summers on “Gilligan’s Island,” died in Los Angeles on Wednesday from Covid-19

A #DEATHWISH !

Goodnight Pierre Cardin

French fashion designer Pierre Cardin, hailed for his visionary creations but also for bringing stylish clothes to the masses, died Tuesday aged 98, his family told AFP.

Cardin, who was born to a low-income family in northern Italy but became a France-based fashion superstar, died in a hospital in Neuilly in the west of Paris, his family said.

“It is a day of great sadness for all our family. Pierre Cardin is no more,” the statement said.

It said after a lifetime spanning a century he had left France and the world a “great unique artistic heritage” and not only in fashion.

Born into poverty in 1922 near Venice in northern Italy, his family em

George Floyd We Have Not Forgotten You

Eaves, 72, is one of the volunteers who regularly tend the area where George Floyd was killed by police. In this four-block radius, some residents and volunteers work together to keep things running as they hold the space while pressing the city to meet their demands. Eaves picks up trash and checks on plants. He shifts artwork and tributes around to make them more visible. He cleans to present what he calls an “aesthetic dignity” to the space.

Are You In A Storm?

Jesus is the Storm Bender. This story brings to mind something I read: The question is never, “Are you in a storm?” The question is, “Is Jesus in your boat?”

Jesus is the water-transforming, dead-raising, sick-healing, hope-giving, food-providing, resurrecting mankind, saving Son of God.

Facebook Cash Scam Alert

The Latest Cash #Scam – BEWARE AND STAY AWAY FROM THESE

It goes a little like this, the post states they are giving away $1,200 for the first 50 commenters. Then you get a message that reads:

Actually Gcash is a well known application based on puzzles games, you can check on Apple play store or Google play store to confirm what I’m talking about, so your duty is to purchase gift cards, they make use of gift cards a lot to promote Application and games on Apple store, ITunes Store, Google play store, Steam wallet store, Amazon store, so your duty is to purchase gift card at Walmart or any store and you supply it to them, If you purchase $100 you get $1200 If you purchase $200 you get $2400 If you purchase $300 you get $3600 If you purchase $400 you get $4800 If you purchase $500 you get $6000 If you purchase $800 you get $9600 If you purchase $1000 you get $12000
It’s real and legit See Less