#Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday in the United States, and Thanksgiving 2021 occurs on Thursday, November 25. In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and the Wampanoag shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies.

Thanksgiving is a time for celebration, good food, and giving thanks. So as we gather with family, crush unworldly amounts of stuffing, and enjoy a football game in the crisp autumn air, let’s also acknowledge the real history of the holiday and practice gratitude by giving back.

Four hundred years later, the so-called first Thanksgiving is undergoing a reassessment. Museums and historic sites in Plymouth and around the country are telling a more nuanced story about the origins of the holiday—one that goes far beyond the lasting legend of smiling Pilgrims and Wampanoag people happily enjoying a big meal together.

“It wasn’t even called Thanksgiving back then,” says Darius Coombs, cultural and outreach coordinator for the Cape Cod–based Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe. “The Pilgrims had a large harvest that first year. So they have a feast. [Wampanoag leader Massasoit, or Ousamequin] shows up with about 90 of his men, and they bring five deer with them. They never ever mention turkey at that feast.”

In 1620, a small group of English separatists packed up and headed for the New World in search of religious freedom. Calling themselves “Saints” (the term “Pilgrims” wouldn’t be used to describe the settlers for another 200 years), they headed to what is now Delaware but landed in Plymouth in December after being blown off course by storms. The colonists first encountered the peaceful yet cautious Wampanoag the following spring.
At the time, the two disparate groups were attempting to find common ground. In April 1621, both had signed a treaty pledging to come to the aid of the other in case of attack. After losing nearly half of their settlers to sickness during their first winter in America, the English were teetering on extinction. The Wampanoag weren’t far from that reality themselves: Between 1616 and 1619, diseases introduced by European colonizers killed up to 90 percent of New England’s Native population in an epidemic now referred to as the Great Dying. Greatly weakened, the tribe also needed help fending off incursions from the Narragansett, a rival Native group.
There’s no evidence that the Wampanoag people were even invited in the first place. An account from the time said 90 members of the Wampanoag tribe were present and makes no mention of invitations. Some experts believe that these 90 men were an army, sent by Wampanoag leader Ousamequin at the sound of gunshots (which turned out to be a part of the celebration).
In their first encounter with the Wampanoag people, the Pilgrims stole from the tribe’s winter provisions — it wasn’t until later that Ousamequin formed an alliance between the groups. Even then, the alliance really only existed because the Wampanoag people were ravaged by diseases brought by European colonizers in the years prior. It was less about intercultural harmony and more about survival (made necessary by the actions of these settlers).
That first harvest was followed by deadly conflicts between colonizers and Native people, including (but definitely not limited to) the Wampanoags. The Europeans repaid their Native allies by seizing Native land and imprisoning, enslaving, and executing Native people.
Following “Thanksgiving” celebrations by European settlers often marked brutal victories over Native people, like the Pequot Massacre of 1636 or the beheading of Wampanoag leader Metacom in 1676.
Source: Smithsonian Magazine; DoSomething

Yes I Missed It Too

The 29th Annual Canstruction New York, raising money for City Harvest, will take place from November 4 ~ 15 at Brookfield Place, this year as an in-person event!

View some images here, they are amazing

https://gothamtogo.com/the-annual-canstruction-will-be-an-in-person-event-in-2021-at-brookfield-place-nyc/

Germany Is Running A PSA To Help Americans With Hunger!!!

A little girl holding a teddy bear on a stoop does not have access to nutritional food, as the German narrator explains. 20 percent of people in America struggle to afford food, compared to Germany’s six percent. Help support GreatNationsEat so everyone can have access to food.
— Read on www.ispot.tv/ad/7PO1/great-nations-eat-germany-for-america

Great Nations Eat TV Commercial, ‘Germany for America’ – iSpot.tv

Can You Spot The Difference

A Bridgeport man has been charged in a fatal shooting. 

Police arrested Robert Sorrells for the deadly shooting of Jonathan DaSilva. 

The shooting happened Oct. 2 on Arctic and Pembroke streets. 

Sorrells was taken into custody last night and faces murder and gun-related charges. 

Officials say he is being held on a $2 million bond.

A Fairfield County man who is awaiting trial for an earlier DUI has been charged with driving drunk and killing an area woman. 

Robert Oxer, age 26, of Darien, was charged on Thursday, Oct. 21 with a warrant for manslaughter with a motor vehicle, operating under the influence and motor vehicle charges, said the Connecticut State Police. 

Oxer was charged in connection with a crash on Route 8 in Trumbull on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020.

During the crash he was allegedly driving a motorcycle at more than 80 miles per hour when he hit the back of another vehicle, state police said. 

His passenger, 36-year-old Shirley Regado-Rodriguez, of Stamford, was pronounced dead at the scene from multiple injuries. 

Court records show Oxer is awaiting trial on several charges, including strangulation stemming from a 2019 arrest in Darien. 

He is being held on a $250,000 bond.

Being On Welfare Is Hard Work

Texas Teacher Puts Foot On Students Neck

UPDATE: Greenville ISD Teacher Who Put Foot On Student’s Neck For Photo Resigns As Board Was To Consider Termination

GREENVILLE, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – The Greenville Independent School District has placed one of their teachers on administrative leave, and is conducting an investigation after a photo surfaced of one of their staff members with their foot on a student’s neck.

Wednesday morning, April 21, Greenville ISD sent an apology letter to parents.

GISD Superintendent Demetrus Liggins says the photo was very disturbing. “My initial reaction was first concern for the child, followed by immediate disgust by the image.”

The Jackson family, however, has mixed opinions on the image. The 11-year-old in the photo, Zaelyn Jackson, says he thought it was all a joke.

When You Love Someone who has #PTSD

Some of us are good at wearing a mask – hiding our symptoms of PTSD. If someone close to you has experienced a traumatic event, it can be hard to know how to support them. The symptoms of PTSD can cause problems with trust, closeness, communication, and problem-solving—which may lead to troubled family relationships or friendships.

Here are several ways you can help your loved one, strengthen your relationship, and take care of yourself too.

FOR YOU

    Take care of your own health.

    Continue doing the things you enjoy and find relaxing.

    Recognize the effects of PTSD on relationships  

    Be realistic about how much you can do.

    Talk about what you’re going through with your own support network.

    Consider seeing a counselor or therapist.

FOR YOUR LOVED ONE

    Plan enjoyable activities with friends and family.

    Encourage them to get treatment.   

    Offer to go to the doctor with them. 

    Make a crisis plan – together.

    Check in with them often.

    Be a good listener.

Supporting someone with PTSD can take a lot of time and energy—and it can be stressful. It’s common to feel that taking care of yourself is selfish, or that you don’t have time. But taking care of yourself is actually an important part of caring for your loved one. If your needs are met, you’ll be a stronger source of support for them.

Your Children and the News

With everything going on in the news today, it can be frightening for young people. Here are a few tips to help your child understand/navigate the news.

Find Out What Your Child Already Knows

    Ask your kids questions to see if they know about a current event. For school-age kids and teens, you can ask what they have heard at school or on social media.

    Consider your child’s age and development. Younger kids may not grasp the difference between fact and fantasy. Most kids realize the news is real by the time they are 7 or 8 years old.

    Follow your child’s lead. If your child doesn’t seem interested in an event or doesn’t want to talk about it at the moment, don’t push.

Answer Questions Honestly and Briefly

    Tell the truth, but share only as much as your child needs to know. Try to calm any fears and help kids feel safe. Don’t offer more details than your child is interested in.

    Listen carefully. For some kids, hearing about an upsetting event or natural disaster might make them worry, “Could I be next? Could that happen to me?” Older kids may have lots of questions. Focus on what your kids ask so you can help them cope with their fears. An adult’s willingness to listen sends a powerful message.

    It’s OK to say you don’t know the answer. If your child asks a question that stumps you, say you’ll find out. Or use age-appropriate websites to spend time together looking for an answer.

Help Kids Feel in Control

    Encourage your child to talk. If your child is afraid about what’s going on, ask about it. Even when kids can’t control an event — like a natural disaster — it can help them to share their fears with you.

    Urge teens to look beyond a news story. Ask why they think an outlet featured a frightening or disturbing story. Was it to boost ratings and clicks or because the story was truly newsworthy? In this way, a scary story can be turned into a discussion about the role and mission of the news.

    Teach your children to be prepared, not panicked. For example, if the news is about a natural disaster, make a family plan for what you might do. If an illness is spreading, talk about ways to protect yourself and others.

    Talk about what you can do to help. After a tragic event, finding ways to help can give kids a sense of control. Look for news stories that highlight what other people are doing.

    Put news stories in context. Broaden the discussion from a specific news item about a difficult event to a larger conversation. Use it as a way to talk about helping, cooperation, and the ways that people cope with hardship.

Limit Exposure to the News

    Decide what and how much news is appropriate for your child. Think about how old your kids are and how mature they are. Encourage them to take breaks from following the news, especially when the topics are difficult.

    Keep tabs on the amount of difficult news your child hears. Notice how often you discuss the news in front of your kids. Turn off the TV so the news is not playing in the background all day.

    Set limits. It’s OK to tell your kids that you don’t want them to have constant exposure and to set ground rules on device and social media use.

    Watch the news with your child and talk about it. Turn off a story if you think it’s not appropriate for your child.

Keep the Conversation Going

    Talk about current events with your child often. Help kids think through stories they hear – good and bad. Ask questions like: “What do you think about these events?” or “How do you think these things happen?” With these types of questions, you can encourage conversation about non-news topics.

    Watch for stress. If your child shows changes in behavior (such as not sleeping or eating, not wanting to be around people, or worrying all the time), call your child’s doctor or a behavioral health care provider. They can help your child manage anxiety and feel better able to cope

Full Blown #Racism

Here is racist couple from Kingston NH who run wooden stone creations lcc that like to record homophobic, racist videos they need to be cancelled and their business closed for this type of behavior if it doesn’t bother you then you need to look in the mirror why this is tolerated.

https://www.woodnstonecreationsisracist.com

Happy #Native American Day

Happy  Thanksgiving – Per Christopher Columbus – “As soon as I arrived in the Indies, on the first Island which I found, I took some of the natives by force in order that they might learn and might give me information of whatever there is in these parts.”

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