Being On Welfare Is Hard Work

Texas Teacher Puts Foot On Students Neck

UPDATE: Greenville ISD Teacher Who Put Foot On Student’s Neck For Photo Resigns As Board Was To Consider Termination

GREENVILLE, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – The Greenville Independent School District has placed one of their teachers on administrative leave, and is conducting an investigation after a photo surfaced of one of their staff members with their foot on a student’s neck.

Wednesday morning, April 21, Greenville ISD sent an apology letter to parents.

GISD Superintendent Demetrus Liggins says the photo was very disturbing. “My initial reaction was first concern for the child, followed by immediate disgust by the image.”

The Jackson family, however, has mixed opinions on the image. The 11-year-old in the photo, Zaelyn Jackson, says he thought it was all a joke.

When You Love Someone who has #PTSD

Some of us are good at wearing a mask – hiding our symptoms of PTSD. If someone close to you has experienced a traumatic event, it can be hard to know how to support them. The symptoms of PTSD can cause problems with trust, closeness, communication, and problem-solving—which may lead to troubled family relationships or friendships.

Here are several ways you can help your loved one, strengthen your relationship, and take care of yourself too.

FOR YOU

    Take care of your own health.

    Continue doing the things you enjoy and find relaxing.

    Recognize the effects of PTSD on relationships  

    Be realistic about how much you can do.

    Talk about what you’re going through with your own support network.

    Consider seeing a counselor or therapist.

FOR YOUR LOVED ONE

    Plan enjoyable activities with friends and family.

    Encourage them to get treatment.   

    Offer to go to the doctor with them. 

    Make a crisis plan – together.

    Check in with them often.

    Be a good listener.

Supporting someone with PTSD can take a lot of time and energy—and it can be stressful. It’s common to feel that taking care of yourself is selfish, or that you don’t have time. But taking care of yourself is actually an important part of caring for your loved one. If your needs are met, you’ll be a stronger source of support for them.

Your Children and the News

With everything going on in the news today, it can be frightening for young people. Here are a few tips to help your child understand/navigate the news.

Find Out What Your Child Already Knows

    Ask your kids questions to see if they know about a current event. For school-age kids and teens, you can ask what they have heard at school or on social media.

    Consider your child’s age and development. Younger kids may not grasp the difference between fact and fantasy. Most kids realize the news is real by the time they are 7 or 8 years old.

    Follow your child’s lead. If your child doesn’t seem interested in an event or doesn’t want to talk about it at the moment, don’t push.

Answer Questions Honestly and Briefly

    Tell the truth, but share only as much as your child needs to know. Try to calm any fears and help kids feel safe. Don’t offer more details than your child is interested in.

    Listen carefully. For some kids, hearing about an upsetting event or natural disaster might make them worry, “Could I be next? Could that happen to me?” Older kids may have lots of questions. Focus on what your kids ask so you can help them cope with their fears. An adult’s willingness to listen sends a powerful message.

    It’s OK to say you don’t know the answer. If your child asks a question that stumps you, say you’ll find out. Or use age-appropriate websites to spend time together looking for an answer.

Help Kids Feel in Control

    Encourage your child to talk. If your child is afraid about what’s going on, ask about it. Even when kids can’t control an event — like a natural disaster — it can help them to share their fears with you.

    Urge teens to look beyond a news story. Ask why they think an outlet featured a frightening or disturbing story. Was it to boost ratings and clicks or because the story was truly newsworthy? In this way, a scary story can be turned into a discussion about the role and mission of the news.

    Teach your children to be prepared, not panicked. For example, if the news is about a natural disaster, make a family plan for what you might do. If an illness is spreading, talk about ways to protect yourself and others.

    Talk about what you can do to help. After a tragic event, finding ways to help can give kids a sense of control. Look for news stories that highlight what other people are doing.

    Put news stories in context. Broaden the discussion from a specific news item about a difficult event to a larger conversation. Use it as a way to talk about helping, cooperation, and the ways that people cope with hardship.

Limit Exposure to the News

    Decide what and how much news is appropriate for your child. Think about how old your kids are and how mature they are. Encourage them to take breaks from following the news, especially when the topics are difficult.

    Keep tabs on the amount of difficult news your child hears. Notice how often you discuss the news in front of your kids. Turn off the TV so the news is not playing in the background all day.

    Set limits. It’s OK to tell your kids that you don’t want them to have constant exposure and to set ground rules on device and social media use.

    Watch the news with your child and talk about it. Turn off a story if you think it’s not appropriate for your child.

Keep the Conversation Going

    Talk about current events with your child often. Help kids think through stories they hear – good and bad. Ask questions like: “What do you think about these events?” or “How do you think these things happen?” With these types of questions, you can encourage conversation about non-news topics.

    Watch for stress. If your child shows changes in behavior (such as not sleeping or eating, not wanting to be around people, or worrying all the time), call your child’s doctor or a behavioral health care provider. They can help your child manage anxiety and feel better able to cope

Full Blown #Racism

Here is racist couple from Kingston NH who run wooden stone creations lcc that like to record homophobic, racist videos they need to be cancelled and their business closed for this type of behavior if it doesn’t bother you then you need to look in the mirror why this is tolerated.

https://www.woodnstonecreationsisracist.com

Happy #Native American Day

Happy  Thanksgiving – Per Christopher Columbus – “As soon as I arrived in the Indies, on the first Island which I found, I took some of the natives by force in order that they might learn and might give me information of whatever there is in these parts.”

Native Americans

Text Messaging Scam Involving #Mailed Packages

A new text messaging scam involving mailed packages that allow fraudsters to gain access to personal information has been making the rounds across the country, federal officials warn.

The Federal Trade Commission is among the agencies that have issued an alert after consumers made numerous complaints after receiving a text message saying that a package pending, telling the user to click a link to set up delivery for the item.

Once the link is clicked, users will be instructed to provide personal identifying information. Scammers have posed as drivers from FedEx, USPS, UPS, and other delivery services since the scam came to light.

The FTC said that in many cases the scammers know the cell phone user’s first name – and sometimes even their last name — though the messages are not legitimate.

“The scammers are pretty crafty in putting these things together and trying to trick people to fall for them by making them think that they’re real messages,” an FTC spokesperson noted.

According to the FTC, “If you get an unexpected text message, don’t click on any links. If you think it could be legit, contact the company using a website or phone number you know is real. Don’t use the information in the text message.”

Do You Receive a Call From 264-35

Who’s calling now? That number doesn’t ring a bell. Hold the phone, says the Federal Trade Commission. You could be a potential victim of the growing “one-ring” cell phone scam.

Here’s how it works: Scammers are using auto-dialers to call cell phone numbers across the country. Scammers let the phone ring once — just enough for a missed call message to pop up.

The scammers hope you’ll call back, either because you believe a legitimate call was cut off, or you will be curious about who called. If you do, chances are you’ll hear something like, “Hello. You’ve reached the operator, please hold.” All the while, you’re getting slammed with some hefty charges — a per-minute charge on top of an international rate. The calls are from phone numbers with three-digit area codes that look like they’re from inside the U.S., but actually are associated with international phone numbers — often in the Caribbean. The area codes include: 268, 284, 473, 664, 649, 767, 809, 829, 849 and 876.

If you get a call like this, don’t pick it up and don’t call the number back. There’s no danger in getting the call: the danger is in calling back and racking up a whopping bill.

If you’re tempted to call back, do yourself a favor and check the number through online directories first. They can tell you where the phone number is registered.

If you’ve been a victim of the “one-ring” scam, try to resolve the charges with your cell phone carrier. If that doesn’t work, file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission and the Federal Communications Commission.

And as a general rule: Read your phone bill often — line by line. If you don’t recognize or understand a charge, contact your carrier.

Support Our Black Businesses

Who is Daddy Backwards Entertainment

I know you are probably wondering, What does Daddy Backwards mean or stand for? Well, Caasi Semaj is the female version of a “Junior” child, named after her father with a unique twist. You may look at her name and think the spelling is wrong, but that is far from the case, Caasi’s father is named “Isaac James” and if you reverse that it spells “Caasi Semaj” and that is where the nickname “Daddy Backwards” originates from. Like her dad, Caasi is bold, strong-willed, ambitious, and loves to laugh. She is also sensitive, sweet, generous, and loves to be outdoors.

What Do They Offer

 
   

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Daddy Backwards Entertainment