Facebook Has Lost Control

No one is watching the barn at Facebook when they disable your account and can’t tell you why…

Breast cancer

Shouting love, peace, joy, and good health to all of the women touched by breast cancer

Name That Show

“…Mr. Braxton Mr. Braxton the bear gotta pee, the bear gotta pee”

Name That Show

“…my math says 49% of humanity needs to die…”

The Insurrection

Watch here…

Loss of a Child to My Friend…

Monica, I’m so saddened by the loss of Michael, if I could…

I’d wipe your tears;

If I was Almighty- because I’m human I’d bring him back;

I would say it’s going to be alright

Id say say “hold on” to God’s unchanging hand

I’d say God knows best

I’d say God knows best

If I were you and folk said that to me I’d be like shut up – she’s gone and it hurts and I’d question everything I did whether wrong or right – it would all be wrong

So what I’ll say is I love you and I’m here for you…

Dear God, I bring Monica a grieving parent into your throne of grace. Lord, she is going through a lot of pain after the loss of her child Michael. It is not an easy thing for a parent to bury their child. Father comfort her. Help her to continue being faithful to you even through the pain. Lavish her with your love and fill the void left in her heart with your unconditional love. In the name that is of Jesus Christ, I believe and pray. Amen.

Can You Spot The Difference

A Bridgeport man has been charged in a fatal shooting. 

Police arrested Robert Sorrells for the deadly shooting of Jonathan DaSilva. 

The shooting happened Oct. 2 on Arctic and Pembroke streets. 

Sorrells was taken into custody last night and faces murder and gun-related charges. 

Officials say he is being held on a $2 million bond.

A Fairfield County man who is awaiting trial for an earlier DUI has been charged with driving drunk and killing an area woman. 

Robert Oxer, age 26, of Darien, was charged on Thursday, Oct. 21 with a warrant for manslaughter with a motor vehicle, operating under the influence and motor vehicle charges, said the Connecticut State Police. 

Oxer was charged in connection with a crash on Route 8 in Trumbull on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020.

During the crash he was allegedly driving a motorcycle at more than 80 miles per hour when he hit the back of another vehicle, state police said. 

His passenger, 36-year-old Shirley Regado-Rodriguez, of Stamford, was pronounced dead at the scene from multiple injuries. 

Court records show Oxer is awaiting trial on several charges, including strangulation stemming from a 2019 arrest in Darien. 

He is being held on a $250,000 bond.

You Can’t Handle the Truth

Understanding the Debt Ceiling

The federal debt ceiling will be reinstated on August 1, 2021, at around $28.5 trillion. At that point, the Treasury Department will begin using accounting tools at their disposal, called “extraordinary measures,” to avoid defaulting on the government’s obligations. The Treasury Department has estimated that these measures will be exhausted as soon as mid-to-late-September, while the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), the Bipartisan Policy Center and other outside analysts predict exhaustion in the fall near the start of the next fiscal year (e.g., likely September, October, or November). At that point, absent a new agreement to either raise or suspend the debt ceiling, the Treasury will be unable to continue paying the nation’s bills. Congress could address the debt ceiling through reconciliation, which provides for passage of legislation with a simple majority vote in the Senate.

The national debt is the total amount of outstanding borrowings by the U.S. Federal government, accumulated over our history. The Federal government needs to borrow money to pay its bills when its ongoing operations cannot be funded by Federal revenues alone. When this happens, the U.S. Treasury Department creates and sells securities. These securities are the debt owed by the Federal government. There are many different types of Treasury debt; bills, notes, and bonds are the most common ones. The various types of debt differ primarily in when they mature—ranging from a few days to 30 years—and in how much interest they pay. The United States has not run an annual surplus since 2001, and has thus borrowed to fund government operations every year since then.

The debt limit is a ceiling imposed by Congress on the amount of debt that the U.S. Federal government can have outstanding. This limit has been set at $28.4 trillion since August 1st, 2021.

It is also important to note that the debt limit is not a forward-looking budgeting tool that reveals what policymakers think are ideal levels of spending and revenue. Rather, it reflects the spending and revenue decisions debated and enacted in prior years by prior Congresses and Administrations; in fact, 97 percent of the current national debt stems from policy choices made before the Biden Administration took office in January 2021—choices made by both parties on their own and in a bipartisan fashion. The debt limit is the amount that the U.S. Treasury can borrow to pay the bills that have become due based on these prior policy decisions.

Once the debt limit is hit, the Federal government cannot increase the amount of outstanding debt; therefore, it can only draw from any cash on hand and spend its incoming revenues. The U.S. Treasury can also take certain “extraordinary measures” to extend how long it can continue to pay all the government’s obligations while staying below the limit. These measures include accounting techniques within several government accounts that temporarily reduce the amount of U.S. Treasury securities issued to those accounts. These actions include suspending new investments or redeeming existing investments early. By reducing the amount of outstanding Treasury securities, the level of outstanding debt temporarily falls, slightly extending the amount of time that the government can continue to satisfy its obligations.

When the U.S. Treasury exhausts its cash and extraordinary measures, the Federal government loses any means to pay its bills and fund its operations beyond its incoming revenues, which only cover part of what is required (about 80 percent in 2019). While the United States has hit the debt limit before, it has never run out of resources and failed to meet its financial obligations. Take the debt limit crises in 2011 and 2013, for example; the debt ceiling was raised in the former episode (Congress raised the cap by an explicit dollar amount) and suspended in the latter (Congress eliminated the debt limit entirely for a specified period of time) in time, before the U.S. Treasury ran out of cash and exhausted all extraordinary measures. More recently, in 2019, the United States once again hit the debt limit, but Congress suspended the ceiling, eliminating the cap until August 1st, 2021.

Instant Cup of Soup

Oh my goodness it’s only a 3rd cup of soup

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