On a snowy night in 1969, Edwin was shot in his home, while Miriam and her mother, Bettye, were inside. “I remember, I heard my mother cry ‘Edwin!’ and I sat up in the bed, and I was immediately engulfed in fear,” Miriam, now 55, tells Jean. Jean and her mother were Pratts’ neighbors. They

Edwin Pratt – Did You Know?Read More »

At the end of the Civil War, many black families, formerly enslaved, found their way to Webster Groves. They began to settle on Vinegar Hill and along Shady Creek. One of these persons was Ken Lankford, who was a preacher. He began preaching, just after the war in 1865, in a brush arbor, alongside Shady

#WebsterGroveRead More »

👉🏾Within 10 days of sustained protests:Minneapolis bans use of choke holds. 👉🏾Charges are upgraded against Officer Chauvin, and his accomplices are arrested and charged. 👉🏾Dallas adopts a “duty to intervene” rule that requires officers to stop other cops who are engaging in inappropriate use of force. 👉🏾New Jersey’s attorney general said the state will update

What Have We Accomplished By ProtestingRead More »

In these days of analyzing confusing elections and examining consequential figures in our past, people who cleared a path for our future stand out.  Margaret E. Morton had an extraordinary career in Connecticut politics that was sparked by her role in a Bridgeport neighborhood issue.  In the early 1970’s, she and other East End residents

Margaret E. Morton – The Woman Who Would Not Step AsideRead More »

Have you ever been called a “winch” or a “hoe”? I have often heard Black women refer to each other as winches, hoes, and bitches.  The terms sound much like a term of endearment, a term which defines their friendship as very close.  Black women can, have and will refer to their friends as bitches,

That Winch Over There…Read More »