We’ve been relying on one another’s expertise

Wiretapping, Healthcare, Lies, Journalism, talk, talk and more talk.  The radio, TV, Sirius XM, Twitter and Facebook are all alive and jumping from one Trump story to the next.  Between his Tweets and Fact Finding reality TV has become a thing of the past.  The question that is overwhelmingly  at the front of my brain is why do folks believe all the false statements and lies that  have been thrown at us.  Then I read the article below and #reasoning has been clearly defined.

It’s one thing for me to flush a toilet without knowing how it operates, and another for me to favor (or oppose) an immigration ban without knowing what I’m talking about.

Virtually everyone in the United States, and indeed throughout the developed world, is familiar with toilets. A typical flush toilet has a ceramic bowl filled with water. When the handle is depressed, or the button pushed, the water—and everything that’s been deposited in it—gets sucked into a pipe and from there into the sewage system. But how does this actually happen?

…“illusion of explanatory depth,” just about everywhere. People believe that they know way more than they actually do. What allows us to persist in this belief is other people. In the case of my toilet, someone else designed it so that I can operate it easily. This is something humans are very good at. We’ve been relying on one another’s expertise ever since we figured out how to hunt together, which was probably a key development in our evolutionary history.

… our dependence on other minds reinforces the problem. If your position on, say, the Affordable Care Act is baseless and I rely on it, then my opinion is also baseless.

 

 

New discoveries about the human mind show the limitations of reason.

Source: Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds

 

When Journalism Goes Awry, Over and Over Again

Why does the media continue to post and repeat the Tweets of #Trump? Is it really to inform the public, surely they know we can read it for ourselves. Police are taught that once you fire your pistol there is no taking back the bullet.

 

I see no system-wide fix. Journalists themselves need to resolve this. They should look in a mirror and reflect on their very real influence. Police are taught that once you fire your pistol there is no taking back the bullet. Reporters must remember their words can have the power of a bullet and consider the consequences when they fire their journalistic guns.

Source Amme& Associates

Why does the media continue to post and repeat the Tweets of #Trump? Is it really to inform the public, surely they know we can read it for ourselves…

After the picnic is over, does one keep the grill going because the aroma is pleasing?

 

Good Night Gwen…

Gwen covered eight presidential campaigns, moderated two vice-presidential debates and served for 17 years on the NewsHour and as moderator and managing editor of “Washington Week.” In her early career, she covered politics and city hall for some of the country’s most prominent newspapers, including the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Baltimore Evening Sun, carving a path as one of the most accomplished journalists in U.S. media. She won countless awards, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the National Press Club’s Fourth Estate Award, and was the best-selling author of “The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama.”

 

 

Veteran television journalist Gwen Ifill, the longtime host of PBS’ “Washington Week” and co-anchor of “PBS NewsHour,” has died. She was 61. A PBS spokesperson confirmed that Ifill passed away Monday after a months-long battle with cancer. “Gwen was a standard bearer for courage, fairness and integrity in an industry going through seismic change,” Sara

Source: Gwen PBS

MTV – Misleading Story Line

@MTVNews Misleading story line for the curious minds about the  Illuminati.  https://t.co/njJuV6MXps

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