#Arkansas #Midazolam

Lastly some argue that Jesus confirmed capital punishment and even His death on the cross confirms the belief that death for death is acceptable and appropriate. I on the other hand have this to say… Jesus did NOT die on the cross and He was hung for a crime that He had NOT committed and it was most assuredly cruel and unusual punishent.

Folk take drugs for one reason or another i.e. medical or recreational. Physicians prescribe drugs for medical reasons and/or  for addicts who must get their fix and they want it  “legally”.  What happens when a Pharmacy does not have the prescribed drug or the Drug Dealer runs out of his/her “product” – very simply the consumer drives or walks to another pharmacy and the same thing for the addict on the street, not a situation in the world that will stop an addict from copping cocaine, heroin or any other pharmaceutical should the #monkey call.

Midazolam may cause severe breathing problems (eg, respiratory depression, respiratory arrest), especially when used for sedation in noncritical care settings. Respiratory depression and respiratory arrest could result in brain damage or death if not treated properly. Midazolam should only be used under appropriate close medical supervision.

Midazolam is used for – Reducing anxiety or producing drowsiness or anesthesia before certain medical procedures or surgery. It may also be given continuously to maintain sedation or anesthesia in certain patients. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Midazolam is a #benzodiazepine. It works in the central nervous system (brain) to cause sleepiness, muscle relaxation, and short-term memory loss, and to reduce anxiety.

In a story by Alan Blinder in the New York Times – The chemist Armin Walser who helped invent the sedative coupled with the fact that in Arkansas, a prisoner has not been put to death since November 2005 what is all  the hoopla about now?

Midazolam is planned as the first of three drugs in the state’s lethal injections. The drug is intended to render a prisoner unconscious and keep him from experiencing pain later in the execution, when other drugs are administered to stop the breathing and heart. Why not obtain a comparable drug that provides the same effect at a LOWER COST!? Walgreens midazolam 1 bottle (118ml) 2mg/ml syrup $ 90.38.

Supreme Court – In a 5-to-4 vote, the court ruled that using midazolam does not violate the Eighth Amendment, which prohibits “cruel and unusual punishment.” In executions, the drug has been used to induce unconsciousness before other drugs are administered to stop an inmate’s breathing and stop the heart.

Midazolam Gone Wrong – Dennis McGuire, convicted of the rape and murder of a pregnant woman in 1989, was executed  in Ohio using a combination of two drugs that had never before been used in an execution. Attorneys for McGuire and medical experts argued that the use of the drugs represented an unconstitutional, “cruel and unusual” execution, because of the possibility that McGuire would be conscious and in pain as he died.  “Ohio is taking drugs that are normally used for things like a colonoscopy, and they’re giving massive overdoses to kill people,”

Arkansas has executed Ledell Lee, the state’s first inmate to be put to death since 2005, for a 1993 murder. Lee was one of eight death row inmates Arkansas had planned to execute by April 30, the day before the state’s supply of the lethal injection drug midazolam expires.

Lastly some argue that Jesus confirmed capital punishment and even His death on the cross confirms the belief that death for death is acceptable and appropriate.  I on the other hand have this to say… Jesus did NOT die on the cross and He was hung for a crime that He had NOT committed and it was most assuredly cruel and unusual punishment.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/04/21/arkansas-prepares-to-carry-out-first-execution-since-2005.html

How Connecticut became a model for prison reform

Behind Osborn Correctional facility stands a laboratory

Behind the walls of the Osborn Correctional Institution stands a laboratory for one of the most aggressive experiments in criminal justice reform currently underway in the United States. Under the stewardship of Gov. Dannel Malloy, a Democrat, Connecticut has seen its prison population fall to a 20-year low, while rates of reported violent crime have plummeted.

Source: How Connecticut became a model for prison reform

Medical Marijuana Program Continues to Grow

The number of patients in the state of Connecticut receiving medical marijuana treatment keeps growing, now at 13,440

According to an article in the CT News Junkie, “The number of patients in the state of Connecticut receiving medical marijuana treatment keeps growing, now at 13,440…”

Of course it the number of patients smoking weed would rise for at least 2 reasons:

  1.  Addiction;
  2.  Friends who are addicts want a supply;

A story in Psychology today states, “A realistic concern for recreational users of marijuana is whether or not they will become addicted. There are no easy answers to this question. In my opinion, the most unbiased book on this and other related topics is The Science of Marijuana (2008). The Science of Marijuana is written by Leslie L. Iverson, a professor of pharmacology at the University of Cambridge in England. In the book, he reviews decades of international research on marijuana, both laboratory research and survey research. Based on his review of the scientific literature, between 10 to 30% of regular users will develop dependency. Only about 9% will have a serious addiction. For an excellent post on the biology of marijuana addiction see http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/all-about-addiction/201001/is-marijuana-addictive-you-can-bet-your-heroin”

The demand has been so great that one of those dispensaries, Bluepoint Wellness in Branford, recently received permission from a local zoning commission to move into a much bigger space across the street from its current location on East Main Street which is 5 minutes away from Branford High School located on 185 E Main St, Branford, CT 06405.

According to (Kajstura, 2014),Connecticut’s drug free school zone laws require mandatory minimum sentences of up to 3 years for certain drug-related offenses committed with 1500 feet of a school, day care, or public housing.  The facility is currently a 5 minute drive and approximately 32 minute walk from the high school – oh, but this is legal distribution!

Source: CT News Junkie

Gumbiner, J. (2010, December 5). Is Marijuana Addictive. Retrieved from https://www.bing.com/search?q=why+is+marijuana+addictive&pc=MOZI&form=MOZLBR

Prison Policy Initiative – http://www.prisonpolicy.org/zones.html

 

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