Military Disability Ratings Help

When a service member develops a medical condition that may make him/her Unfit for Duty, he/she begins the DoD Process.

Please feel free to follow the links below for assistance in your disability rating.

Search your condition here

The DoD Disability Process – When a service member develops a medical condition that may make him/her Unfit for Duty, he/she begins the DoD Process. Think Big Veterans Disability

VASRD –  The Veteran Affairs Schedule for Rating Disabilities is a federal regulation that lists detailed requirements for assigning Military Disability Ratings to conditions for Military Disability

Is Your Rating Wrong – If you have carefully reviewed the site and feel that your case was not determined correctly during the DoD Disability Process or the VA Disability Process, or you think you deserve a higher Military Disability Rating, here’s what to do.

Search your condition here

Thank you for your service,
Always Faithful USMC – Semper Fi
I am a Former US Marine

Veterans Appeals

Once the board receives your appeal, it assigns a docket date based on the date VA received your Form 9. This date is important: under the law, the board must work appeals in docket order.

Board of Appeals

Appeals at the Board of Veterans’ Appeals

Once the board receives your appeal, it assigns a docket date based on the date VA received your Form 9. This date is important: under the law, the board must work appeals in docket order. Currently, the median, or middle, docket date of appeals the board is working is July 2014. Some newer appeals can be pushed to the front of the line: those from older Veterans and survivors, those who are terminally-ill or those who have documented financial hardship, etc. It’s important to know that if the board remands (returns) your appeal to the regional office to gather more evidence, you won’t lose your place on the board’s docket.

Just like in the regional offices, several Veterans service organizations are located at the board. If you choose not to have a hearing before the board, your representative will write a legal argument on your behalf. The board will consider that argument when it conducts its own de novo review of your claim. If you choose to have a hearing, your representative will help you explain your case at that hearing. VA will transcribe the hearing and put it in your file. The board can do one of three things: grant your appeal, deny your appeal or send (remand) it back to the regional office for more action.

If you disagree with the board’s decision, you may pursue an appeal to the Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims (CAVC). If the CAVC denies your appeal, you can appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. If you lose the appeal there, you can petition the U.S. Supreme Court for review. The Supreme Court grants review in very few appeals. Generally, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court review only legal matters in an appeal, not agency decisions.

Author- Catherine Trombley

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